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Mestiza

600.00
Mestiza.jpg

Mestiza

600.00

Rea Lynn de Guzman (2017)

acrylic & image transfer on piña fiber mounted on panel
10 x 8 in.

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more artworks available in gallery. contact us to schedule an appointment / request images.

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Rea Lynn de Guzman (2017)

acrylic & image transfer on piña fiber mounted on panel
10 x 8 in.

see more by this artist +

more artworks available in gallery. contact us to schedule an appointment / request images.

Rea Lynn de Guzman is an interdisciplinary artist working in painting, print media, and sculpture.  Originally from Manila, Philippines, she immigrated to the United States as a teenager.  She received her BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  She has exhibited her work in the Bay Area, Chicago, Hawaii, and India.  Her sculpture After Maria Clara’s Piña Fiber Sleeve was featured at ARTslant, where it was awarded

ARTslant’s 6th 2014 Showcase Juried Winner in the mixed-media category.  She teaches at the San Francisco Center for the Book and Root Division, where she is currently a Filipina Teaching Artist Fellow. She lives and works in San Francisco.

In this body of work, I explore: the colonial history of the pineapple in the Philippines, the native’s appropriation of piña fiber, and its relationship with the idea of “Maria Clara” (a metonym referring to a mestiza character from Jose Rizal’s novel, Noli me Tangere).  Originally, Spain introduced the pineapple to the Philippines (from another colony in South America); now, the Philippines is the world’s largest pineapple producer. Piña fiber –extracted from leaves and woven with organza –became an ingredient in traditional, upper-class Filipina women’s clothing known colloquially as “Maria Clara.” The “Maria Clara” then became a symbol of “Philippine” ideals of beauty, female social roles, status, and stereotypes, imposed by Spain’s colonization –e.g., chastity, deference, demureness, light skin, and passivity.  This underscores an irony: the displacement and inferiorization of native notions of such ideals by the colonizer, signified by clothing made from a foreign fruit. Today, popular Philippine concepts regarding beauty and status center on imported products, media perpetuation of westernized images, and the championing of myriad skin-whitening products.  My series consists of mixed media work such as, image transfers inspired by the “Maria Clara” dress, as well as layered ghost prints on paper that emphasize the pendulum between additive and reductive processes.  This series manifests my extraction and resistance of these displaced ideals and haunting stereotypes of Filipina women.